Ryan Guy

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Speech and Debate Events

Event

Example

Informative Speaking: An original, factual speech by the student on a realist subject to fulfill the general aim to inform the audience. Audio-visual aids may or may not be used to supplement and reinforce the message. Multiple sources should be used and cited in the development of the speech. Minimal notes are permitted. Maximum time is 10 minutes.
Persuasive Speaking: An original speech by the student designed to inspire, reinforce, or change the beliefs, attitudes, values or actions of the audience. Audio-visual aids may or may not be used to supplement and reinforce the message. Multiple sources should be used and cited in the development of the speech. Minimal notes are permitted. Maximum time limit is 10 minutes.
Communication Analysis: An original speech by the student designed to offer an explanation and/or evaluation of a communication event such as a speech, speaker, movement, poem, poster, film, campaign, etc., through the use of rhetorical principles. Audio-visual aids may or may not be used to supplement and reinforce the message. Manuscripts are permitted. Maximum time limit is 10 minutes
After Dinner Speaking: An original, humorous speech by the student, designed to exhibit sound speech composition, thematic, coherence, direct communicative public speaking skills, and good taste. The speech should not resemble a night club act, an impersonation, or comic dialogue. Audio-visual aids may or may not be used to supplement and reinforced the message. Minimal notes are permitted. Maximum time limit is 10 minutes.
Prose Interpretation: An original or selections of prose material of literary merit, which may be drawn from more than one source. Focus of this event is on the development of the narrative/story. Play cuttings and poetry are prohibited. Use of manuscript is required. Maximum time is 10 minutes including introduction.
Poetry Interpretation: A selection or selections of poetry of literary merit, which may be drawn from more than one source. A primary focus of this event should be on the development of language. Play cuttings and prose works are prohibited. Use of manuscript is required. Maximum time limit is 10 minutes including introduction.
Program Oral Interpretation: A program of thematically-linked selections of literary merit, chosen from two or three recognized genres of competitive interpretation (prose/poetry/drama). A primary focus of this event should be on the development of the theme through the use of narrative/story, language, and/or characterization. A substantial portion of the total time must be devoted to each of the genres used in the program. Different genre means the material must appear in separate pieces of literature (e.g., A poem included in a short story that appears only in that short story does not constitute a poetry genre.) Only one selection may be original. Use of manuscript is required. Maximum time limit is 10 minutes including introduction.
Drama Interpretation: A cutting that represents one or more characters from a play or plays of literary merit. The focus of this event is on the development of characterization. This material may be drawn from stage, screen, or radio. Use of manuscript is required. Maximum time limit is 10 minutes including introduction
Dramatic Duo: A cutting from one or more texts of literary merit, humorous or serious, involving the portrayal of two or more characters presented by two individuals. The material may be drawn from any genre of literature. This is not an acting event; thus, no costumes, props, lighting, etc, are to be used. Presentation is from the manuscript and the focus should be off-stage and not to each other. Maximum time limit is 10 minutes including introduction.
Impromptu Speaking: An impromptu speech, substantive in nature, with topic selections varied by round and by section. Topics will be derived from quotations. Speakers will have a total of 7 minutes for both preparation and speaking. Timing commences with the acceptance of the topics sheet. Limited notes are permitted.
Extemporaneous Speaking: Contestants will be given three topics in the general area of current event, choose one, and have 30 minutes to prepare a speech that is the original work of the student. Maximum time limit for the speech is 7 minutes. Limited notes are permitted. Student will speak in listed order. Postings of topics will be staggered.
Readers Theater: An interpretation of literature by a group of oral readers who act as a medium of expression for an audience. While Readers Theatre is both oral and visual, the emphasis is on the oral interpretation of the printed work and its resultant effects on the minds, emotions and imagination of the listeners/viewers. The audience should have feeling of unified whole in which each performer at all times contributes to the total effect desired. Theaters must have a minimum of three performers and a maximum of 14. The time limitation is 25 minutes with 2 minutes allowed for set-up and take-down.

A Sample NFA-LD Debate

Having just got back from the national tournament in Michigan I decided it would be a good idea to record some sample debates for future semesters.  A couple of my debaters offered to do a demo debate for my argumentation class.  Here is the video.  I’ll also attach the affirmative case for folks who want to use it as a teaching tool.

LD DEBATE DEBATE AFF

Learning Wikipedia with #WikiSOO

Wikipedia logoOver the last 6 weeks I have been taking the online Writing Wikipedia Articles (#WIKISOO) course as part of the school of open through Peer to Peer University.  I has been a fantastic course and I have learned a bunch of interesting things.  I thought I would wrap things up with a list of the Top 5 Things I learned  😎

 

Top 5 Things I learned in #WikiSOO Feb14

  • Editing Wikipedia is not that scary – Like for reals.  I was initially skeptical about the process.  I had a Wikipedia account from back in 2006, and had only made a handful of scared edits to talk pages.  In the last 6 weeks I have made over 400 edits and find the process to be both relaxing and intellectually stimulating.
  • People in the Wikipedia community are crazy nice – Most of my random online encounters have consisted of arguing with trolls who comment on my YouTube channel videos.  To put things gently that is not a community that encourages civil discourse.  Wikipedia on the other hand is this weird online counterpublic where it is a norm to assume good faith.  People are even polite when dealing with spam and obvious abuse.  It does a lot to encourage participation by newbies.
  • Gamification on Wikipedia is Fun and Motivating – There are these Wikipedia specific badges you can earn from other users called BarnStars.  They represent the work you have done.  While it seems insignificant, they really do motivate participation.  On a side note I am looking forward to integrating Open Badges more into the classes I teach.
  • Creating and Editing New Pages is Fun – I’ve been creating a new page about Public Sphere Pedagogy as my final project for the course.  It has been an interesting process and taught me a lot about  collaborating in digital spaces.  Even in the midsts of my hectic schedule I keep find myself logging on to make a couple quick edits or to add an additional reference I stumbled across.
  • WikiPedia needs our help – Wikipedia is easily one of the most impressive achievements humanity as put together in our lifetimes.  The easy to access body of knowledge is great, but still needs a lot of work.  I feel committed to work to improve the articles relevant to my area of expertise.  That said there are a lot of major articles out there that need some love.  I encourage anyone out there to login, create an account and get editing.

I could probably go on for a while with these.  Special thanks to our course facilitators Pete Forsyth and Sara Frank Bristow for putting on such an excellent course.  If you are interested in learning more check out the course homepage at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WIKISOO

Transferring Perspectives Into Student Created Documentaries #WSCA2014 G.I.F.T.S.

Recording On A Phone

Thanks to all those who attended out panel.  As promised here are the assignment materials from my GIFTS:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cameras in the Classroom – 2014 BbCE

Thanks to all those who attended our panel presentation at the Butte College Blackboard Community Exchange.  As promised, here is a plethora of resources to help you start using cameras in the classroom.  We will also upload a video of our presentation in case you missed it.

 

Introduction Video Clip

Workshop Video

[Coming Soon]  😎

Video Walkthoughs

Resources from Workshop

A Few Helpful Links

Please Contact us with questions or TMI for help

 

#ISW 2014 Achievements and Badges : Additional Information

Welcome ISW Participants

Thanks for participating in my lesson on Blackboard achievements and Open Badges. Below you will find copies of my presentation notes, handouts, as well as additional resources relating to open badges.

 

Materials from my Presentation

Websites related to OpenBadges and Bb Achievements

Useful Videos

Open Badges Related Twitter Users

#ISW 2014 How to Brew a Perfect Cup of Coffee in 5 Minutes or Less

Title

Welcome Students. The following guide will give you the quick and easy method to brew a fantastic cup of joe using a french press.  Please note I had to make a couple adjustments to make this process work in the classroom.

Step 1: Press the switch on your electric tea pot and bring to a boil

Press switch on electric tea pot and bring to a boil

Press switch on electric tea pot and bring to a boil

 

Step 2: Add 5 table spoons of fresh beans to the grinder

Step 2: Add 5 table spoons of fresh beans to the grinder

Step 2: Add 5 table spoons of fresh beans to the grinder

 

Step 3: Press the grinder button down for 3 seconds to achieve a rough grind

Step 3: Press the grinder button down for 3 seconds to achieve a rough grind

Step 3: Press the grinder button down for 3 seconds to achieve a rough grind

 

Step 4: Pour your ground coffee into the french press

Step 4: Pour your ground coffee into the french press

Step 4: Pour your ground coffee into the french press

 

Step 5: Set your timer to four minutes and add the hot water

Step 5: Set your timer to four minutes

Step 5: Set your timer to four minutes

 

Step 6: After 15 seconds give the pot a stir and place lid on top (do not push the plunger yet)

Step 6: After 15 seconds give the pot a stir and place lid on top (do not push the plunger yet)

Step 6: After 15 seconds give the pot a stir and place lid on top (do not push the plunger yet)

 

[Intermission:  While you wait for the coffee to brew read a teammate these 5 fun facts about coffee]

  1. Legend has it a 9th-century Ethiopian goat herder discovered coffee by accident when he noticed how crazy the beans were making his goats.
  2. Coffee is a psychoactive. And at high doses it can make you see things… It can also kill you…
  3. The lethal dose of caffeine is roughly 100 cups of coffee.
  4. Johan Sebastian Bach wrote an opera about a woman who was addicted to coffee.
  5. Teddy Roosevelt is and was the greatest American coffee drinker, consuming a gallon a day. But you probably shouldn’t attempt to do that.

Step 7: Slowly push the plunger down

Step 7: Slowly push the plunger down

Step 7: Slowly push the plunger down

 

Step 8: Pour yourself a cup and savor caffeinated victory

Step 8: Pour yourself a cup and savor caffeinated victory

Step 8: Pour yourself a cup and savor caffeinated victory

 

Congratulations! You made a great cup of coffee and can now avoid the fake stuff!

Winning with the french press

Winning with the french press

 

#7 You’re Live

Mozilla School of Webcraft

Mozilla School of Webcraft

 

It has been a fun journey completing the School of Webcraft. As someone with a tech background I did not find very many of these tasks overly difficult. That said I do think I learned a great deal about using this style of education in my own classes. The badge framework combined with a participant user community made for a highly affective learning environment.

 

I really liked the writing code by hand activity we did early on. It was fun to get hands on in an online course. I think I might strive to do some similar activities in the online courses I teach.

Moving forward I would like to look at some of the courses focused on more advanced coding. Learning python or getting a better handle on Java script could be highly useful.

 

As a side note I am hoping to earn my Publishing Badge with this post.  The link to the html page I wrote and published to my domain is http://www.ryanguy.org/helloworld.html

Hosting & DNS

For this assignment we were asked to sign up for a webhost and explain how we setup DNS.

Choosing a Host

DreamHost LogoOver the last several years I have had the pleasure (displeasure if I am being honest) of trying out a variety of different web hosts.  Through a process of trial and error I have come to use and appreciate Dreamhost.  While there is a laundry list of nice things I could say about dreamhost, I will keep it short and relevant.  First is the ease of use. As you will see below, DreamHost makes managing a website easy.  The panel is straightforward, and the wiki explains in simple english how to accomplish tasks. Second is uptime.  There is nothing worse than having recurring outages from your web host.  Dreamhost has a solid record of being up and working, and fixing issues promptly when things are problematic.I also love that that have a system status site and twitter account where they communicate open and often about any issues (Page,  Twitter). Last is their support.  They have a great team based out of Southern California that is quick to respond and very helpful.  I highly recommend them.

 

 

Setting Up DNS: A Step By Step Guide

Step 1: From the Dreamhost Web Panel Select Manage Domains.

Click Manage Domains

Click Manage Domains

Step 2: Click the button to add a new domain.

Click the button to add a new domain.

Click the button to add a new domain.

Step 3: Using the fully hosted options fill in the information about the domain you registered.

Fill in information about your domain.

Fill in information about your domain.

Step 4: Click the fully host this domain option and you are done. (Since I used DreamHost as my registrar they take care of all the DNS setup)

Click "fully host this domain" button

Click “fully host this domain” button

Optional Step:  If you registered your domain elsewhere you will need to go to that place and point the domain and the dreamhost name servers.

  • ns1.dreamhost.com
  • ns2.dreamhost.com
  • ns3.dreamhost.com

#5 Your Domain: Attack the DNS

For this activity we were asked to spend some time researching DNS and explain it in a creative way.  I chose to create a mini YouTube based lecture.  Enjoy.

 

In terms of resources I mostly depended on my own knowledge about DNS.  That said the following resources were also helpful:

The nuts and bolts of putting this artifact together contained a few steps and peices of software.  First, I created a PowerPoint Presentation to serve as the visual component of my presentation. Second, I jotted down a basic outline of what to talk about. Third, I activated screen capture software (http://applian.com/replay-video-capture/) and put the PowerPoint into presentation mode. Fourth, I spoke extemporaneously about the topics on my outline.  Last, I uploaded the video to my YouTube channel and set it to a creative commons attribution licence.

 

As to why I went this route…it was what I was familiar with.  The technical process is the same way I record lectures for my online classes.  It could have been better if I added a few oral citations, but overall not bad for a 30 minute project.

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